Jeremiah 19 & Mark 5

Jeremiah 19

    Thus says the LORD, “Go, buy a potter's earthenware flask, and take some of the elders of the people and some of the elders of the priests, and go out to the Valley of the Son of Hinnom at the entry of the Potsherd Gate, and proclaim there the words that I tell you. You shall say, ‘Hear the word of the LORD, O kings of Judah and inhabitants of Jerusalem. Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I am bringing such disaster upon this place that the ears of everyone who hears of it will tingle. Because the people have forsaken me and have profaned this place by making offerings in it to other gods whom neither they nor their fathers nor the kings of Judah have known; and because they have filled this place with the blood of innocents, and have built the high places of Baal to burn their sons in the fire as burnt offerings to Baal, which I did not command or decree, nor did it come into my mind—therefore, behold, days are coming, declares the LORD, when this place shall no more be called Topheth, or the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, but the Valley of Slaughter. And in this place I will make void the plans of Judah and Jerusalem, and will cause their people to fall by the sword before their enemies, and by the hand of those who seek their life. I will give their dead bodies for food to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the earth. And I will make this city a horror, a thing to be hissed at. Everyone who passes by it will be horrified and will hiss because of all its wounds. And I will make them eat the flesh of their sons and their daughters, and everyone shall eat the flesh of his neighbor in the siege and in the distress, with which their enemies and those who seek their life afflict them.’

    “Then you shall break the flask in the sight of the men who go with you, and shall say to them, ‘Thus says the LORD of hosts: So will I break this people and this city, as one breaks a potter's vessel, so that it can never be mended. Men shall bury in Topheth because there will be no place else to bury. Thus will I do to this place, declares the LORD, and to its inhabitants, making this city like Topheth. The houses of Jerusalem and the houses of the kings of Judah—all the houses on whose roofs offerings have been offered to all the host of heaven, and drink offerings have been poured out to other gods—shall be defiled like the place of Topheth.’”

    Then Jeremiah came from Topheth, where the LORD had sent him to prophesy, and he stood in the court of the LORD's house and said to all the people: “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel, behold, I am bringing upon this city and upon all its towns all the disaster that I have pronounced against it, because they have stiffened their neck, refusing to hear my words.”

(Jeremiah 19 ESV)

Mark 5

    They came to the other side of the sea, to the country of the Gerasenes. And when Jesus had stepped out of the boat, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit. He lived among the tombs. And no one could bind him anymore, not even with a chain, for he had often been bound with shackles and chains, but he wrenched the chains apart, and he broke the shackles in pieces. No one had the strength to subdue him. Night and day among the tombs and on the mountains he was always crying out and cutting himself with stones. And when he saw Jesus from afar, he ran and fell down before him. And crying out with a loud voice, he said, “What have you to do with me, Jesus, Son of the Most High God? I adjure you by God, do not torment me.” For he was saying to him, “Come out of the man, you unclean spirit!” And Jesus asked him, “What is your name?” He replied, “My name is Legion, for we are many.” And he begged him earnestly not to send them out of the country. Now a great herd of pigs was feeding there on the hillside, and they begged him, saying, “Send us to the pigs; let us enter them.” So he gave them permission. And the unclean spirits came out and entered the pigs; and the herd, numbering about two thousand, rushed down the steep bank into the sea and drowned in the sea.

    The herdsmen fled and told it in the city and in the country. And people came to see what it was that had happened. And they came to Jesus and saw the demon-possessed man, the one who had had the legion, sitting there, clothed and in his right mind, and they were afraid. And those who had seen it described to them what had happened to the demon-possessed man and to the pigs. And they began to beg Jesus to depart from their region. As he was getting into the boat, the man who had been possessed with demons begged him that he might be with him. And he did not permit him but said to him, “Go home to your friends and tell them how much the Lord has done for you, and how he has had mercy on you.” And he went away and began to proclaim in the Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him, and everyone marveled.

    And when Jesus had crossed again in the boat to the other side, a great crowd gathered about him, and he was beside the sea. Then came one of the rulers of the synagogue, Jairus by name, and seeing him, he fell at his feet and implored him earnestly, saying, “My little daughter is at the point of death. Come and lay your hands on her, so that she may be made well and live.” And he went with him.

    And a great crowd followed him and thronged about him. And there was a woman who had had a discharge of blood for twelve years, and who had suffered much under many physicians, and had spent all that she had, and was no better but rather grew worse. She had heard the reports about Jesus and came up behind him in the crowd and touched his garment. For she said, “If I touch even his garments, I will be made well.” And immediately the flow of blood dried up, and she felt in her body that she was healed of her disease. And Jesus, perceiving in himself that power had gone out from him, immediately turned about in the crowd and said, “Who touched my garments?” And his disciples said to him, “You see the crowd pressing around you, and yet you say, ‘Who touched me?’” And he looked around to see who had done it. But the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came in fear and trembling and fell down before him and told him the whole truth. And he said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace, and be healed of your disease.”

    While he was still speaking, there came from the ruler's house some who said, “Your daughter is dead. Why trouble the Teacher any further?” But overhearing what they said, Jesus said to the ruler of the synagogue, “Do not fear, only believe.” And he allowed no one to follow him except Peter and James and John the brother of James. They came to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and Jesus saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. And when he had entered, he said to them, “Why are you making a commotion and weeping? The child is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. But he put them all outside and took the child's father and mother and those who were with him and went in where the child was. Taking her by the hand he said to her, “Talitha cumi,” which means, “Little girl, I say to you, arise.” And immediately the girl got up and began walking (for she was twelve years of age), and they were immediately overcome with amazement. And he strictly charged them that no one should know this, and told them to give her something to eat.

(Mark 5 ESV)

Mark 5: As Jesus takes the extra time to address the woman in the crowd, some friends of Jairus run up to deliver the horrifying news that his daughter has just passed away. They express the logical conclusion that there is no need for Jesus to continue on to the house since she is now dead. Imagine being Jairus in this situation. What would you be thinking or wanting to say to Jesus in that moment? 

However, Jesus doesn’t defend Himself or His actions. He simply looks at Jairus and says “Do not fear, only believe.” Jairus had possessed enough faith to come to Jesus for help, but now his faith is being tested far beyond anything that he ever anticipated. Jesus says, “Trust Me.” And this is the pivotal moment in Jairus’ life. To truly ‘trust Him’ is the make or break moment for all of us when it comes to our suffering.

Many of us live our lives assuming and claiming to trust Jesus, but great suffering has a way of exposing whether or not we are simply trusting Jesus on our own terms. For many of us, as long as Jesus plays according to our rules and expectations then we can trust Him. However, the moment He begins to act contrary to what we’re comfortable with, we’re tempted to question Him. We’re tempted to doubt Him. We’re tempted to lose our confidence in Him. We’re forced to face the make or break moment - Can we trust Him? And even more importantly, will we trust Him?
 
Fear versus faith is a life-long war that we will continue to fight throughout this life. When disaster and devastation come suddenly and unexpectedly, how will we respond? Will we run to various worldly distractions to numb our pain? Will we run to superficial friendships that help us forget our circumstances? Will we run to our work and careers to over occupy our minds and energy? Will we run to the excessive indulgence of various addictions? Perhaps we may run to the vain pursuit of earning justification and righteousness through religious excellence? Or will we run and fall at the feet of the only one who offers us hope - Jesus Christ, the Savior Son of God?

Jairus is confronted with the challenge to redirect his focus from his circumstances to the one he has placed his hope in - Jesus Himself. Jesus very easily could have told Jairus right then and there what He was planning to do. He even could have healed his daughter right at that moment without continuing on to visit her. Instead, He takes this opportunity to perform a greater healing. The healing of Jairus himself.

The woman in the crowd had come looking for a quick-fix but experienced a life-altering understanding of who Jesus was. Jairus had come looking for a healing but also experienced a life-altering understanding of who Jesus was. He asked for a healing and was granted a resurrection. In both of these encounters, suffering was the concern of those coming to Jesus, but their salvation was the ultimate concern of Jesus.