Numbers 35 & Psalm 79

Numbers 35

    The LORD spoke to Moses in the plains of Moab by the Jordan at Jericho, saying, “Command the people of Israel to give to the Levites some of the inheritance of their possession as cities for them to dwell in. And you shall give to the Levites pasturelands around the cities. The cities shall be theirs to dwell in, and their pasturelands shall be for their cattle and for their livestock and for all their beasts. The pasturelands of the cities, which you shall give to the Levites, shall reach from the wall of the city outward a thousand cubits all around. And you shall measure, outside the city, on the east side two thousand cubits, and on the south side two thousand cubits, and on the west side two thousand cubits, and on the north side two thousand cubits, the city being in the middle. This shall belong to them as pastureland for their cities.

    “The cities that you give to the Levites shall be the six cities of refuge, where you shall permit the manslayer to flee, and in addition to them you shall give forty-two cities. All the cities that you give to the Levites shall be forty-eight, with their pasturelands. And as for the cities that you shall give from the possession of the people of Israel, from the larger tribes you shall take many, and from the smaller tribes you shall take few; each, in proportion to the inheritance that it inherits, shall give of its cities to the Levites.”

    And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the people of Israel and say to them, When you cross the Jordan into the land of Canaan, then you shall select cities to be cities of refuge for you, that the manslayer who kills any person without intent may flee there. The cities shall be for you a refuge from the avenger, that the manslayer may not die until he stands before the congregation for judgment. And the cities that you give shall be your six cities of refuge. You shall give three cities beyond the Jordan, and three cities in the land of Canaan, to be cities of refuge. These six cities shall be for refuge for the people of Israel, and for the stranger and for the sojourner among them, that anyone who kills any person without intent may flee there.

    “But if he struck him down with an iron object, so that he died, he is a murderer. The murderer shall be put to death. And if he struck him down with a stone tool that could cause death, and he died, he is a murderer. The murderer shall be put to death. Or if he struck him down with a wooden tool that could cause death, and he died, he is a murderer. The murderer shall be put to death. The avenger of blood shall himself put the murderer to death; when he meets him, he shall put him to death. And if he pushed him out of hatred or hurled something at him, lying in wait, so that he died, or in enmity struck him down with his hand, so that he died, then he who struck the blow shall be put to death. He is a murderer. The avenger of blood shall put the murderer to death when he meets him.

    “But if he pushed him suddenly without enmity, or hurled anything on him without lying in wait or used a stone that could cause death, and without seeing him dropped it on him, so that he died, though he was not his enemy and did not seek his harm, then the congregation shall judge between the manslayer and the avenger of blood, in accordance with these rules. And the congregation shall rescue the manslayer from the hand of the avenger of blood, and the congregation shall restore him to his city of refuge to which he had fled, and he shall live in it until the death of the high priest who was anointed with the holy oil. But if the manslayer shall at any time go beyond the boundaries of his city of refuge to which he fled, and the avenger of blood finds him outside the boundaries of his city of refuge, and the avenger of blood kills the manslayer, he shall not be guilty of blood. For he must remain in his city of refuge until the death of the high priest, but after the death of the high priest the manslayer may return to the land of his possession. And these things shall be for a statute and rule for you throughout your generations in all your dwelling places.

    “If anyone kills a person, the murderer shall be put to death on the evidence of witnesses. But no person shall be put to death on the testimony of one witness. Moreover, you shall accept no ransom for the life of a murderer, who is guilty of death, but he shall be put to death. And you shall accept no ransom for him who has fled to his city of refuge, that he may return to dwell in the land before the death of the high priest. You shall not pollute the land in which you live, for blood pollutes the land, and no atonement can be made for the land for the blood that is shed in it, except by the blood of the one who shed it. You shall not defile the land in which you live, in the midst of which I dwell, for I the LORD dwell in the midst of the people of Israel.”

(Numbers 35 ESV)


Psalm 79

A Psalm of Asaph.

    O God, the nations have come into your inheritance;
        they have defiled your holy temple;
        they have laid Jerusalem in ruins.
    They have given the bodies of your servants
        to the birds of the heavens for food,
        the flesh of your faithful to the beasts of the earth.
    They have poured out their blood like water
        all around Jerusalem,
        and there was no one to bury them.
    We have become a taunt to our neighbors,
        mocked and derided by those around us.
    
    How long, O LORD? Will you be angry forever?
        Will your jealousy burn like fire?
    Pour out your anger on the nations
        that do not know you,
    and on the kingdoms
        that do not call upon your name!
    For they have devoured Jacob
        and laid waste his habitation.
    
    Do not remember against us our former iniquities;
        let your compassion come speedily to meet us,
        for we are brought very low.
    Help us, O God of our salvation,
        for the glory of your name;
    deliver us, and atone for our sins,
        for your name's sake!
    Why should the nations say,
        “Where is their God?”
    Let the avenging of the outpoured blood of your servants
        be known among the nations before our eyes!
    
    Let the groans of the prisoners come before you;
        according to your great power, preserve those doomed to die!
    Return sevenfold into the lap of our neighbors
        the taunts with which they have taunted you, O Lord!
    But we your people, the sheep of your pasture,
        will give thanks to you forever;
        from generation to generation we will recount your praise.

(Psalm 79 ESV)


Something to Consider

Numbers 35: The Promised Land was a Holy Land. However, it's holiness wasn't on account of God's people dwelling there, but on account of God Himself dwelling there over His people. This is why the theology behind the cities of refuge is clearly revealed at the end of this section in Numbers 35:

"You shall not defile the land in which you live, in the midst of which I dwell, for I the LORD dwell in the midst of the people of Israel."

Cities of refuge were a way of securing a fair trial for someone accused of homicide. Typically if an act of homicide occurred, the closest male relative of the victim would be expected to seek retribution by putting the murderer to death for his crime. However, this was problematic when the homicide was unintentional and just the result of a tragic accident done by the one accused of murder. Therefore, the cities of refuge were to be a safe haven for those wrongly accused of intentional murder. The accused was to flee to one of these cities where he would stand before the congregation, and they would judge whether or not he was to be executed for his crime. If the accused was then acquitted from the charges brought against him, he was brought under protection from the avenger seeking retribution through his death. However, the acquitted were required to stay within the boundaries of the city of refuge until the death of the high priest.

In a unique way, this way of deliverance from death prefigures the way in which Christ sets us free from the wages of our sin (whether intentional or unintentional). Like the cities of refuge, those who flee to Christ from their sin will find their ultimate protection from our accuser (Satan) and the penalty of our sin (death). In this way, we are reminded that through the death of our ultimate High Priest we have been forgiven of all charges brought against us and restored to walk in the true freedom found only in Christ.