Proverbs 31 & 1 Timothy 2

Proverbs 31

    The words of King Lemuel. An oracle that his mother taught him:

    What are you doing, my son? What are you doing, son of my womb?
        What are you doing, son of my vows?
    Do not give your strength to women,
        your ways to those who destroy kings.
    It is not for kings, O Lemuel,
        it is not for kings to drink wine,
        or for rulers to take strong drink,
    lest they drink and forget what has been decreed
        and pervert the rights of all the afflicted.
    Give strong drink to the one who is perishing,
        and wine to those in bitter distress;
    let them drink and forget their poverty
        and remember their misery no more.
    Open your mouth for the mute,
        for the rights of all who are destitute.
    Open your mouth, judge righteously,
        defend the rights of the poor and needy.
    
    
         An excellent wife who can find?
        She is far more precious than jewels.
    The heart of her husband trusts in her,
        and he will have no lack of gain.
    She does him good, and not harm,
        all the days of her life.
    She seeks wool and flax,
        and works with willing hands.
    She is like the ships of the merchant;
        she brings her food from afar.
    She rises while it is yet night
        and provides food for her household
        and portions for her maidens.
    She considers a field and buys it;
        with the fruit of her hands she plants a vineyard.
    She dresses herself with strength
        and makes her arms strong.
    She perceives that her merchandise is profitable.
        Her lamp does not go out at night.
    She puts her hands to the distaff,
        and her hands hold the spindle.
    She opens her hand to the poor
        and reaches out her hands to the needy.
    She is not afraid of snow for her household,
        for all her household are clothed in scarlet.
    She makes bed coverings for herself;
        her clothing is fine linen and purple.
    Her husband is known in the gates
        when he sits among the elders of the land.
    She makes linen garments and sells them;
        she delivers sashes to the merchant.
    Strength and dignity are her clothing,
        and she laughs at the time to come.
    She opens her mouth with wisdom,
        and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue.
    She looks well to the ways of her household
        and does not eat the bread of idleness.
    Her children rise up and call her blessed;
        her husband also, and he praises her:
    “Many women have done excellently,
        but you surpass them all.”
    Charm is deceitful, and beauty is vain,
        but a woman who fears the LORD is to be praised.
    Give her of the fruit of her hands,
        and let her works praise her in the gates.
    

(Proverbs 31 ESV)

1 Timothy 1

    First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all, which is the testimony given at the proper time. For this I was appointed a preacher and an apostle (I am telling the truth, I am not lying), a teacher of the Gentiles in faith and truth.

    I desire then that in every place the men should pray, lifting holy hands without anger or quarreling; likewise also that women should adorn themselves in respectable apparel, with modesty and self-control, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly attire, but with what is proper for women who profess godliness—with good works. Let a woman learn quietly with all submissiveness. I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet. For Adam was formed first, then Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and became a transgressor. Yet she will be saved through childbearing—if they continue in faith and love and holiness, with self-control.

(1 Timothy 2 ESV)

1 Timothy 2: As Christians, we are to be people of prayer, and we are to show absolutely no prejudice in the people that we spend time in prayer for. Paul urges us to pray for “kings and all who are in high positions” in order that we may lead a “peaceful and quiet life.” The Christian life should be a life in this world defined by godliness and dignity. We are to exhibit godliness in the proper worship of our Lord, and we are to exhibit dignity in the proper conduct towards our fellow man. 

What is our general attitude towards those in authority and even more so those in governing authority over the affairs of our nation? Do we spend more time criticizing rather than praying for those in high positions? 

May we embrace our call as praying mediators between God and the men who hold important positions over the people in society. And may we never forget that we are the redeemed product of the ultimate Mediator who did not criticize but instead gave His life for us while we were still His enemies.