Ruth 1 & Acts 26

Ruth 1

    In the days when the judges ruled there was a famine in the land, and a man of Bethlehem in Judah went to sojourn in the country of Moab, he and his wife and his two sons. The name of the man was Elimelech and the name of his wife Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Chilion. They were Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah. They went into the country of Moab and remained there. But Elimelech, the husband of Naomi, died, and she was left with her two sons. These took Moabite wives; the name of the one was Orpah and the name of the other Ruth. They lived there about ten years, and both Mahlon and Chilion died, so that the woman was left without her two sons and her husband.

    Then she arose with her daughters-in-law to return from the country of Moab, for she had heard in the fields of Moab that the LORD had visited his people and given them food. So she set out from the place where she was with her two daughters-in-law, and they went on the way to return to the land of Judah. But Naomi said to her two daughters-in-law, “Go, return each of you to her mother's house. May the LORD deal kindly with you, as you have dealt with the dead and with me. The LORD grant that you may find rest, each of you in the house of her husband!” Then she kissed them, and they lifted up their voices and wept. And they said to her, “No, we will return with you to your people.” But Naomi said, “Turn back, my daughters; why will you go with me? Have I yet sons in my womb that they may become your husbands? Turn back, my daughters; go your way, for I am too old to have a husband. If I should say I have hope, even if I should have a husband this night and should bear sons, would you therefore wait till they were grown? Would you therefore refrain from marrying? No, my daughters, for it is exceedingly bitter to me for your sake that the hand of the LORD has gone out against me.” Then they lifted up their voices and wept again. And Orpah kissed her mother-in-law, but Ruth clung to her.

    And she said, “See, your sister-in-law has gone back to her people and to her gods; return after your sister-in-law.” But Ruth said, “Do not urge me to leave you or to return from following you. For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there will I be buried. May the LORD do so to me and more also if anything but death parts me from you.” And when Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more.

    So the two of them went on until they came to Bethlehem. And when they came to Bethlehem, the whole town was stirred because of them. And the women said, “Is this Naomi?” She said to them, “Do not call me Naomi; call me Mara, for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me. I went away full, and the LORD has brought me back empty. Why call me Naomi, when the LORD has testified against me and the Almighty has brought calamity upon me?”

    So Naomi returned, and Ruth the Moabite her daughter-in-law with her, who returned from the country of Moab. And they came to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest.

(Ruth 1 ESV)

Acts 26

    So Agrippa said to Paul, “You have permission to speak for yourself.” Then Paul stretched out his hand and made his defense:

    “I consider myself fortunate that it is before you, King Agrippa, I am going to make my defense today against all the accusations of the Jews, especially because you are familiar with all the customs and controversies of the Jews. Therefore I beg you to listen to me patiently.

    “My manner of life from my youth, spent from the beginning among my own nation and in Jerusalem, is known by all the Jews. They have known for a long time, if they are willing to testify, that according to the strictest party of our religion I have lived as a Pharisee. And now I stand here on trial because of my hope in the promise made by God to our fathers, to which our twelve tribes hope to attain, as they earnestly worship night and day. And for this hope I am accused by Jews, O king! Why is it thought incredible by any of you that God raises the dead?

    “I myself was convinced that I ought to do many things in opposing the name of Jesus of Nazareth. And I did so in Jerusalem. I not only locked up many of the saints in prison after receiving authority from the chief priests, but when they were put to death I cast my vote against them. And I punished them often in all the synagogues and tried to make them blaspheme, and in raging fury against them I persecuted them even to foreign cities.

    “In this connection I journeyed to Damascus with the authority and commission of the chief priests. At midday, O king, I saw on the way a light from heaven, brighter than the sun, that shone around me and those who journeyed with me. And when we had all fallen to the ground, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.’ And I said, ‘Who are you, Lord?’ And the Lord said, ‘I am Jesus whom you are persecuting. But rise and stand upon your feet, for I have appeared to you for this purpose, to appoint you as a servant and witness to the things in which you have seen me and to those in which I will appear to you, delivering you from your people and from the Gentiles—to whom I am sending you to open their eyes, so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and a place among those who are sanctified by faith in me.’

    “Therefore, O King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision, but declared first to those in Damascus, then in Jerusalem and throughout all the region of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, performing deeds in keeping with their repentance. For this reason the Jews seized me in the temple and tried to kill me. To this day I have had the help that comes from God, and so I stand here testifying both to small and great, saying nothing but what the prophets and Moses said would come to pass: that the Christ must suffer and that, by being the first to rise from the dead, he would proclaim light both to our people and to the Gentiles.”

    And as he was saying these things in his defense, Festus said with a loud voice, “Paul, you are out of your mind; your great learning is driving you out of your mind.” But Paul said, “I am not out of my mind, most excellent Festus, but I am speaking true and rational words. For the king knows about these things, and to him I speak boldly. For I am persuaded that none of these things has escaped his notice, for this has not been done in a corner. King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe.” And Agrippa said to Paul, “In a short time would you persuade me to be a Christian?” And Paul said, “Whether short or long, I would to God that not only you but also all who hear me this day might become such as I am—except for these chains.”

    Then the king rose, and the governor and Bernice and those who were sitting with them. And when they had withdrawn, they said to one another, “This man is doing nothing to deserve death or imprisonment.” And Agrippa said to Festus, “This man could have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar.”

(Acts 26 ESV)

Something to Consider

Acts 26: Paul’s personal testimony provides his critics with powerful evidence concerning the authority of his gospel message. Paul’s testimony also provides us with a powerful example concerning the nature of his message as well. In examining his testimony before King Agrippa, we can make three strong observations about the nature of the gospel message that he preached. 

Christ isn’t calling us into a religion.

Paul’s appeal to his own training as a Pharisee is a way of telling the religious authorities, “Listen, I’ve been there done that. I was at the top of all religious schooling. I was rigorously upholding all the religious traditions. I was even passionately persecuting those who seemed to be compromising the customs of our religion. It doesn’t work. You cannot please God through your religious performance. Instead, I’ve met a Man who has called me out of religion. He’s made it plain to me that salvation is by God’s grace through faith alone. Not faith plus religion.”

How is Christ able to call us out of religion and call us by grace instead? 

Because Christ fulfilled all the requirements of religion for us. It’s just like He said in Matthew 5, “I haven’t come to abolish the religious requirements. I’ve come to fulfill them.” Christ has fulfilled religion and replaced it with Himself. 

Christ isn’t calling us based on our resume.

Paul had been devoting his life to fighting against the same gospel that he was now preaching. He rejected Christ because He felt like everything about Him was a lie and even worse was blasphemy. He was hunting and killing Christians. Paul’s resume wasn’t necessarily 'Christ-worthy', and yet Christ still chose to call him by His grace and use Him for His purposes. God doesn’t love us because we’ve done anything worthy of His love. We do not and can not earn God’s love and acceptance. God loves us simply because He freely chooses to love us. 

How is Christ able to secure this kind of love for us who don’t deserve it?

Because at the cross, Christ replaced our resume with His own. He took on our record of imperfections and sin and substituted it with His own record of perfection and righteousness. Christ secures God’s love for us by making us worthy of such love.

Christ is calling us into a relationship.

A big aspect of Paul’s defense of the gospel concerns the nature of his message. His message about Christ is not something that he was simply taught or learned. It was revealed to him by Christ Himself. It went beyond an intellectual understanding of Christ, and was something he actually experienced. 

Christ has called us to more than just an intellectual understanding of who He is. There’s an experiential aspect to true Christian faith. There’s a personal sense and experience of a real relationship with Christ. A true Christian experiences his theology. He experiences what He believes to be true about God. And the true Christian knows that with this experience comes the responsibility to reveal Christ to others as well. 

Christ calls us out of religious performance, Christ makes us worthy of this calling and Christ calls us into a relationship with God. This is the heart of what it means to be a Christian, and this is the very essence of Paul’s gospel message. This is a message from God, not simply a message of men. When we embrace this truth about God, we embrace a new relationship with the God who has revealed this truth about Himself.